What is a Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)?

PM Center Insider

–  By Fahad Usmani, PMP®, PMI-RMP®, PM Study Circle contributing

Fahad UsmaniFahad Usmani, PMP®, PMI-RMP®, is founder of PMstudycircle.com and the author of A2Z of PMP Certification Exam. He has over 10 years of global portfolio management experience, specializing in leading complex corporate projects. He currently serves as an Inspection Engineer in Kuwait and facilitates project management training programs throughout the Middle-East, and is the founder of PM Study Circle where he writes about project management education and certifications.

 

 

No one wants a defective product, whether they are an end user or the company which is developing the product. Defects are costly, frustrating, and damaging to the company’s reputation.

5 Reasons Why So Many IT Projects Fail

– By Dr. Emad Rahim, PMP, CSM, Kotouc Family Endowed Chair and Associate Professor

Despite the importance of information management in business operations, many companies experience difficulty in executing IT projects within the pre-determined time or budget constraints. Many IT designs are cancelled before completion and never implemented. Researchers have indicated that most IT projects fail because of poor project management skills. In these failed projects, estimation mistakes, lack of clarity, and unstable goal and objectives were cited as core problem areas. Below are additional areas of concern as described in the article, Why Web Projects Fail.

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Poor planning

IT managers often lack the time to appropriately plan because of the pressure from senior management, and as a result, the project is performed before the plan is appropriately defined. If the plan is prematurely executive on by the team, items like resources, scheduling, budgeting, risk management and even scope will often have information gaps and inconsistencies.

Unclear Goals and Objectives

Well-designed project objectives are clear, meaningful, measurable, and ae aligned with organizational goals and mission. Projects must have clearly defined requirements, the absence of which can create timing delays and communication bottlenecks. If a project manager lacks the experience to describe the type and the extent of resources he or she really needs, the project is at risk.

Misalignment

Information systems need to be aligned with the organization’s business objectives. When discussing alignment, it is important to address market share, customer satisfaction, employee engagement, corporate citizenship and innovation. To begin, companies must properly assess everything, and then align its findings with information systems. It is also essential for executive leadership to be actively involved in the alignment process to ensure strategic goals are met.

Quality of Interaction

The quality of the interaction between the Information System (IS) project team and the end-users in a development project are not always clearly linked to the success of projects in terms of meeting budgets and product goals. This is due to the lack of collaboration across business units that prevent proper program status updates that optimize operational reviews. Another issue relates to internal and external team conflicts that affect communication, and this reflects negatively on the project as a whole. Attention to both internal and external conflict is necessary to accomplish project goals successfully.

Changing Objectives during Project

Change can be good, but not if it blindsides everyone on the project team. Inside the realm of project management, judgment must be made as to whether to remain loyal to the initial requirements and objectives or to make changes. Sometimes project managers cannot handle trade-off decisions and make decisions without the basis of rational insights.

Conclusion

Continued interest in project management is expected to increase yearly throughout different industries, partly due to rapidly developing globalization and growing awareness of knowledge management. Companies must manage a wider range of coverage, increasingly complex information system architecture, and the rapidly changing environment. In order to face such challenges, chief information officers (CIOs) must create an IT portfolio management model that is aligned with business goals. It will help the CIO to maintain control over corporate IT assets and IT processes. Furthermore, the CIO and IT project manager should be aware of the common mistakes that destroy IT projects and learn from the identified mistakes. These learning experiences should be captured in a repository so the successors do not make the same mistakes.

The PMO: Developing A Standard Organization

– By Kenneth Day, Data Center Engineer at Nelnet

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Ken Day, Engineer at Nelnet

Ken Day has earned both BA-MIS and MS-MIS, and is currently finishing up his third degree, Master in Project Manager (MPM) at Bellevue University. He currently serve as an Infrastructure Engineer, working with planning, equipment installations and cabling for Nelnet in their Data Center.

Most organizations have some processes and procedures that they may loosely follow as a matter of habit or at least use them as a place to start.  One of the first steps in creating standards to do a thorough investigation into what teams and project managers are using now in the way of templates, procedures or just the methodology that they employ when executing a project.  If an organization has no base standards, it may be possible to adapt a “pre-built” solution and then just move forward but very rarely will an “off-the-shelf” product suit the needs of everyone in the organization.  The existing standards in the organization may not represent best practices or align with generally accepted project management practices (Letavec, 2006) The PMO builds or collaborates on a common set of practices, principles and templates for managing projects.  Standardization means project managers can move more easily between different projects and new project managers can get up to speed faster.  Creating project management templates means standard components of a processes like Risk analysis, Project planning and Scope management, can be reused which can save time and money since they are not created for each new project. (IPlanWare, 2011)  While this can be a huge benefit for most organizations, it will also soon find out that “cookie-cutter” solutions often fall short or the desired results.  So does that means that there are no such things as “Standards”?  No, it means that formal processes may be similar but each project will be unique enough that modifications may involve minor tweaks or major revisions, depending on the nature of the project.

When creating standards, it’s necessary to gather feedback from project managers or others that people in the organization that represent the standard’s intended audience.  The purpose of this is to make sure that the proposed standard will meet the needs of the targeted audience.  Nothing is worse than creating a systems that produces worthless results that increase a projects workload.

Organizations of any industry and size need a Project management Standard to manage external client projects as well as internal improvements.  There is a strong and direct correlation between the maturity of the organization’s Project Management Standard and the overall organization’s performance. (Kapteina, 2016)  Many experts say that organizations will not even survive in today’s business climate anymore if they do not have an appropriate Project management Standard implemented.  The sad reality is that approximately 40% of organizations even in this day and age are still managing their projects with no defined Project Management Standard, which leads in the short-term to lower project success rates, and put severe risks on the overall success of the organization in the long term future.

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(Microsoft, 2016)

But how do you go about establishing the right Project management Standard for your organization?  Do organizations build something up from scratch by themselves?  Many have tried this and failed because it usually involves lots of money, time and effort only to produce little in return.  So is it better for an organization to adopt a third-party project Management methodology and roll it in?  You then have to figure out how to handle the organizations differentiators that make it unique from everyone else.  Off the shelf products are rarely a “one-size-fits-all” product.  Then, once the Project management Standard has been finally built, how shall the organization implement the standard they have created, and keep them up to date?

The answer to this can be found in PMI’s globally accepted Tailoring approach which can be seen as a method to develop and organizations project Management Standard by following several process steps.  It starts with an assessment (to measure the current organization’s maturity level and to suggest the desired change), continues with the development (to create the methodology), and finally not ends but again continues with further improvements (to make sure that there is always the right project management standard in the organization.) (Kapteina, 2016)

Building a customized standard is about bringing together the right mixture of policies, practices, processes, tools, techniques, and templates.  You should mix together the usage of well-known global project management methodologies like those developed by Project Management institute (PMI), some third party Project management standards and last, but more importantly, the integration of the Organization’s differentiators that make the whole package unique.  Companies today need their own Project Management Standard to be able to function successfully in today’s markets.  Building and implementing such a standard is tied directly to the success or failure of that organization.  Organizations without an Established Project Management standard risk disappearing from their market place sooner or later.

A critical success factor in building a standard is the right mixture of required internal differentiators as well as the adoption of the right external methodologies and standards. Tailoring practices from PMI can help manage this process more smoothly. When finally implementing the new Project Management Standard into the organization, a holistic approach is needed to integrate also Program Management and Portfolio Management into the company’s business management framework, connecting all domains to the organization’s vision, missions and strategy. PMO Frameworks can help organizations coordinate such developments across multiple organizational business units. (Nayab, 2010)

An established Project Management Standard will lead to realized strategic objectives. It is important to keep such a standard in the organization continuously up to date. Looking forward, it will be interesting how new offerings in methodologies and technologies may further change the Project Management knowledge as we know it today.  Always keep looking for better ways to accomplish your goals without losing sight of the finished product.
References

Kapteina, Gernot, (2016) Building the Organization’s Project Management Standard, Retrieved March 24th, 2017 from https://gernotkapteina.com/2016/03/27/project-management/

Nayab, N, (2010) Understanding PMO Roles and Responsibilities, Retrieved march 24th 2017 from http://www.brighthubpm.com/certification/69777-understanding-pmo-roles-and-responsibilities/

iPlan. (2011). Responsibilities of a Project Management Office. Retrieved from http://www.iplanware.com/blog/index.php/2011/01/09/responsibilities-of-a-project-management-office-pmo/

Thought Leadership in Project Management: with Brian Grafsgaard, Consulting Practice Director with Q Consulting

– By Dr. Emad Rahim, PMP, SCM, OMCP

Brian Grafsgaard, PMP, PgMP, PfMP  Consulting Director, Q Consulting

Brian Grafsgaard, CSM, PMP, PgMP, PfMP is a Consulting Practice Director with Q Consulting (formerly Quality Business Solutions [QBS]), a Minneapolis, Minnesota (U.S.A.) based consulting firm specializing in portfolio, program, project, change, and compliance management. Brian has been a practicing Project Management Professional (PMP®) since 1998. Brian is also a proven Program Manager and in 2007 became the first in the world to attain the Program Management Professional (PgMP®) credential. In May 2014, Brian also became one of the first to attain the Portfolio Management Professional (PfMP®) credential.

As a portfolio, program, and project manager, Brian has lead the transformation and delivery of enterprise-class solutions in multiple industries. Over the course of a 30+ year career, he has had the privilege of defining and implementing innovative solutions for several organizations, while managing the change necessary to adopt the solutions. Brian is also an active volunteer for PMI Global and was appointed to the PMI Standards Member Advisory Group (SMAG) in Jan. 2016. He was previously selected to serve on the core team that authored The Standard for Program Management–Third Edition (2013, PMI); Brian led the core team that recently published Requirements Management: A Practice Guide (2016, PMI). Brian is also a contributing author of Program Management: A Life Cycle Approach (2012, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC) with a chapter focused on how portfolio, program, and project management enable innovation.

  1. How did your project management career get started?

Like many others, I was an accidental project manager. I started my career as a programmer/analyst, which allowed me to work with companies to help them define their business and technical requirements, then develop the solution (primarily in assembler language). I often initiated projects from the ground floor and saw them through completion. As was often the case, once I became more proficient as a programmer (but also more skilled as an analyst), I was promoted to Project Manager.

  1. How did you obtain your project management education and training?

Once I adjusted to the fact that I was no longer the “doer”, but the person leading the “doers”, I realized I had to learn a whole new set of skills: project management. The organization I was with at the time provided many opportunities for training and education in both project management as well as the “soft skills”. I took full advantage of their development program, supplemented by external courses, including a PMP exam prep session. I eventually earned the PMP credential—the first in the organization to do so—and became an advocate and mentor for others; the experience had forced me to learn a great deal about the “science” of project management. I have since earned the Program Management Professional (PgMP)® and Portfolio Management Professional (PfMP)® through experience and training.

  1. Can you please summarize your industry, and share how organizations are applying project management in the workplace?

It is difficult for me to identify an “industry”. Although I started my career in IT, I have always thought of IT as an “enabler” vs. a distinct industry of its own. Although I started out leading technology projects—primarily software development efforts—as a program and portfolio manager I have become more aligned with the “business”. Any organization, regardless of industry, must create value by continuously enhancing or developing new products, services, or capabilities. And most organizations, regardless of industry, recognize that this happens through project management. I have also seen that many organizations are adopting more adaptive approaches, such as Agile, to develop these products, services, and capabilities. More mature organizations are taking an integrated approach to creating value, leveraging portfolio, program, and project management. Whether the organization takes an adaptive approach or a more traditional approach, it is important to select the right initiatives and maintain alignment of the expected outcomes with the organization’s strategy.

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  1. Do you see any trends in your industry as it relates to project management and other related methodologies?

As discussed above, I am seeing organizations take a more integrated approach to project management, recognizing the need to develop their portfolio and program management capabilities as well. Portfolio management helps ensure that the right projects are initiated to begin with; program management bridges the gap between the organization’s strategy—reflected in the organization’s portfolio—and delivery of the expected benefits and value through related (and often interdependent) projects. I am also seeing the use of more hybrid approaches, applying project management techniques and principles while also applying Agile principles to adapt and deliver value more quickly. I am also seeing more strictly Agile-based organizations extending those capabilities across the organization, scaling and managing dependencies across teams, in a manner very similar to portfolio and program management.

  1. What is your advice to people that are interested in pursuing a career in project management within your industry?

My advice for those interested in pursuing a career in project management (in any industry) would be to learn as much as you can about that industry, but also learn as much as you can about project management itself. I recommend the approach developed by Project Management Institute (PMI)® (http://www.pmi.org/learning/training-development/talent-triangle), which recognizes the need for technical (project management), strategic, business management, and leadership (soft) skills. By learning about the industry you will be able to better understand the strategic and business side of projects, understanding the challenges and opportunities that the organization faces and why the project is being undertaken in the first place. It will allow you to make more sound decisions while leading projects. Learning more about project management will allow you to apply the tools and techniques required to successfully deliver the project. Finally, focusing on leadership and soft skills will better enable you to deliver the project results through others; after all, projects are done through people who must be lead, not managed. Don’t focus on just one area, seek a blend of training and experience across all three dimensions. Start small, leading a small team on a class project or an event and keep learning. Most importantly, learn from your mistakes. Finally, seek out a mentor to help guide you, someone who has experience in the industry you choose. A mentor can help identify your strengths and development needs across these three dimensions and help you tailor your approach.

  1. I noticed you have earned several certifications. What type of value has these certifications provided to you in your career?

Each of these certifications has helped me better understand the “science” behind that particular discipline and provided the baseline knowledge I needed to adapt these disciplines to the organization or a particular situation. Each certification has provided a level of credibility—very important as a consultant, especially—which, coupled with my experience, has opened a lot of doors. Each certification has allowed me to grow and become a more strategic and effective portfolio, program, and project manager. They have also helped me better understand the relationship between these disciplines and how they can be applied together to effectively (and efficiently) execute and deliver results.

  1. Do you think the industry is catching up to better understanding the benefits of program management and portfolio management?

Although project management has become ubiquitous—millions of articles, books, and other resources have been published on the subject—program and portfolio management are still coming of age to some degree. That said, I am seeing more and more awareness of program and portfolio management as complementary disciplines within an overall “strategic execution” ecosystem. More and more articles, books, and resources are available on these subjects than in years past. The introduction of the Portfolio and Program Management Professional credentials by PMI has also increased the visibility of these disciplines. As an example, when I earned the PgMP credential in 2007—I was the first in the world to achieve this certification—there were very few reference materials, outside of federal government publications and the first edition of PMI’s Standard for Program Management, to even study. I am pleased to say that there is now a wealth of material available for both program and portfolio management. Both are becoming much more prevalent in organizations across industries. I am very optimistic that it will only continue to grow as organizations realize the value that program and portfolio management provides.

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  1. What are some of the major gaps you still see in the project management profession and what can industries do to address them?

I think the primary gap is that project management has been viewed as being very “prescriptive”, that project management is the equivalent of “waterfall”. This is a very common misperception because the waterfall approach—especially as a software development life cycle—has often been coupled with a “by the book” project management approach, where scope, schedule, cost, and quality constraints are established up front—at the time of greatest uncertainty—and carefully monitored and “controlled” throughout the life of the project. Waterfall is an approach to developing or enhancing a solution, whether it be a new product, service, or capability; it is not necessarily the approach to managing that development effort. The project manager has traditionally been measured on how well s/he managed to those constraints.

Although it could be argued that “project management” and the resulting project life cycle were dictated more by the development approach—waterfall is a development methodology, not a project management methodology—the two are seen as one. As adaptive approaches become increasingly more prevalent it is imperative that project management as a discipline be viewed as adaptive as well. Project management principles are intended to be applied across the life of the initiative and are not sequential in nature. In my experience, project management has always been intended to be adaptive and iterative in nature. It does no good to stay within the budget and schedule constraints (for example) but deliver something that does not satisfy the need. Although budget and schedule are important, it is also very important to understand how to provide maximum value to the organization and adapt the project to optimize results.

The art of project management is understanding these tradeoffs and knowing which “constraints” are most important; for example, time to market may be the most important so the project should continuously adapt to provide the most value within the timeframe allowed, understanding the impact on budget and scope. In my experience, even “Agile” initiatives have some expectations around schedule, cost, scope, and quality as well as the expectation that risks (both threats and opportunities) will be proactively managed. Organizations must apply the principles of project management in a more adaptive manner, ensuring that the results of the initiative align with the organization’s strategic objectives and provide the benefits intended.

  1. What type of things do you do to stay current in your field (professional development)?

I have always considered myself a lifelong learner. It is a journey, not a destination. There is always something more to learn, new ways to apply my experience and skills, and opportunities to fine tune. For that reason, I dedicate time each day to reading or researching a topic of interest. In addition, I am always willing to take a change and try something new and learn as much as I can about it in the process. For example, although my primary focus has been leading application development initiatives, I have seized the opportunity to take roles in other areas, like IT Services, Compliance Management, or roles on the “business” side. These experiences have broadened and deepened my knowledge and made me a better project, program, and portfolio manager. I have also sought roles where I could learn and leverage more adaptive approaches, such as Scrum and Kanban. These experiences—which I supplemented with reading, training, and research—have given me a broader perspective and the baseline knowledge I need to be able to adapt the approach to an organization or a particular project.

  1. What are your last thoughts or closing remarks to our project manager subscribers?

I would encourage your subscribers to continuously learn and search for opportunities to broaden your knowledge and experience. For example, if you are a project manager but want to be a program manager, learn (through reading, classes, or other means) about program management. Develop a baseline understanding and look for opportunities to apply that knowledge. Start small and grow from there. Seek out a mentor who is knowledgeable in the area that you would like to pursue. I have had a number of mentors—both formal and informal—over the years and each has helped me focus in the right areas and grow.

Bellevue Endowed Professor Dr. Emad Rahim will be recognized by the American Association of Community Colleges

Former OCC student Dr. Emad Rahim will be recognized in April by a national education association, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). Rahim will receive the 2017 Outstanding Alumni Award at the AACC’s National Convention in New Orleans, LA. “The AACC Outstanding Alumni recipients showcase the quality and diverse plethora of the nation’s community […]

via National “Outstanding Alumni Award” for Dr. Emad Rahim —

Project Management Programs at Bellevue Earn GAC Accreditation and Top Degree Rankings

By Dr. Emad Rahim, PMP, SCM, OMCP

2-Bellevue-University2

The Project Management Institute’s Global Accreditation Center (GAC) Directors voted in October 2016 to confer GAC Accreditation status upon two additional Bellevue University programs, the Master of Project Management program and the Master of Science in Management of Information Systems, Information Technology Project Management Concentration.

In doing so, the GAC Directors recognize the strong commitment to project management educational excellence that has been demonstrated by Bellevue University. The accreditation of these two graduate programs will complement the Bachelor of Science in Project Management program which has been accredited by GAC since 2014. “Earning accreditation from GAC is a remarkable achievement,” said Mary Dobransky, Dean of the College of Science and Technology at Bellevue University. “This accreditation recognizes the hard work and dedication of the faculty and staff, and confirms to our students that they are receiving a quality education in line with all the standards set forth by PMI, the industry’s recognized leader.

The Bellevue University Master of Project Management (MPM) is an advanced professional program that is academically recognized as a terminal degree. Bellevue University offers one of only three GAC accredited MPM programs in the U.S. The Master of Science in Management Information Systems (MS-MIS) is a program that provides students both technical competencies and management techniques needed for management positions in Information Systems and related industries. This program offers students the opportunity to specialize in several areas, including the Information Technology Project Management Concentration.

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The MPM degree program was recently ranked #2 in the Top 10 Project Management Programs in the US by IntelligentHQ, and is listed in top ranking by CollegeRank, AffordableColleges and TopManagementDegrees. The MPM program was also featured in Project Eye Magazine (pg. 33-35) and covered in a thought leadership series by IntelligentHQ.com.

Thought Leadership in Project Management: with Heitor Roriz Filho, Agile Coach and Trainer

– By Dr. Emad Rahim, PMP, SCM, OMCP

Heitor Roriz Filho

Heitor Roriz Filho is an “agilero”. He currently works as an Agile Coach and Trainer worldwide, based in Sao Paulo. He is a writer, speaker and trainer in the area of Technology Management. He has been dealing with Agile since 2004 and in addition to speaking for Agile/Scrum, Six Sigma and PMI conferences, he is the founder activist of the ScrumAmazonia user group. He is also the co-founder and Agile Coach of Massimus (http://www.massimus.com) a company focused on APM (Agile Project Management) training and coaching. He holds a M.Sc. in Information Technology from the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Has worked and gathered experience in companies like Itautec-Philco SA, DaimlerChrysler AG, Fraunhofer Institut, FPF (Fundação Paulo Feitoza), among others. He worked for 3 years as a ScrumMaster and Product Owner for FPF and Siemens-Mobile where he also coached teams to implement and improve Scrum in projects. During 2+ years he worked as Information Manager for the local government at Municipal Institute of Urban Planning where he applied Scrum outside of software, in architectural and building projects. He participated as a reasearch assistant in projects belonging to LBA (Large-scale Biosphere-atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) at INPA (http://www.inpa.br) in cooperation with JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) and NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Agency). Heitor is a passionate for Agile and Scrum. He truly believes Agile can change the way we work achieving excellence levels of precision and performance. He is very interested in Agile Leadership and Agile Project Management as levers of improving our ways of work.

  1. How did your project management career get started?

It started in 2004 when I got an engagement as a software developer in an experimental project funded by Siemens Mobile in Brazil. Few months after the project started it grew exponentially and I attended a CSM training by Martine Devos (today my colleague). I was overwhelmed by the amount of information I received and started learning about Scrum and Project Management (studying the PMBOK).

  1. How did you obtain your project management education and training?

I attend for a few months a PMP prep course back in 2005. Back then the prep courses were very long in duration! In the meantime I also attended a CSM training as mentioned above, which is a 2-day training course. I immediately identified that Scrum not only delivers but if well implemented assures higher quality standards and people engagement. So I kept studying the PMBOK by my own and kept on experimenting with Scrum. During my experimentations I had a terrific opportunity to exchange 2 days of project management knowledge with a Six Sigma Black Belt from Sony: I taught him Scrum and he gave me an overview of DMAIC (an instantiation of Deming’s Cycle) and Six Sigma statistics applied to projects. I fell in love with statistics applied to Project Management and have been applying it in my projects until today. In 2011 I had the tremendous opportunity to find like-minded individuals and we founded a company called Massimus. So my customers usually hire me through this company. Few years later I got the PMI-ACP certification (2013).

  1. Can you please summarize your industry, and share how organizations are applying project management in the workplace?

I work with several industries, mostly with the IT industry. Since Scrum can be applied in several knowledge areas and not only software, I have had the opportunity to coach and execute projects in Logistics, Software Development, HR and Sales. These projects were in the following industries: IT, Aeronautics, Insurance, Finance, Oil, Government, Service and Health. What I have identified, is that no matter the industry, if an organization builds software or outsources software development, be it as its end activity or not, they all want to do Scrum or demand that Scrum is used.

So the industries are applying Scrum because it is needed today due to the hyper-competitive environment, where a very short time-to-market and agile ideas validation are mandatory. In a hyper-competitive environment project requirements are nothing but hypothesis that need validation. In terms of Scrum implementation, we can categorize organizations in two: those that do it for real and engage Scrum coaches and those that see Scrum as too simple to engage third-party coaches. Both can succeed but considering probabilities and due to the current organizational mind-set the latter will fail. Agile is part of the new zeitgeist and even though it is simple, it is complex to master and that is counter-intuitive enough for some.

  1. Do you see any trends in your industry as it relates to project management and other related methodologies?

Organizations are at a tipping point. The general trend is not creating knowledge anymore but being able to incorporate into the organization’s DNA the creation and use of knowledge as a competitive advantage. Innovation will become commonplace. Agile is happening at the operational level of organizations but closer to the top, where strategy and budgets are developed, there are other movements belonging to the new zeitgeist, like Beyond Budgeting and Radical Management. This is something that every CEO needs to know in order to understand why and how projects are being executed and planned with Scrum.

  1. What is your advice to people that are interested in pursuing a career in project management within your industry?

I recommend project professionals to be versatile. Do not focus solely on one methodology or concept, but create your project management bag of tools. Start experimenting with multiple concepts, use Scrum as an underlying experimentation framework and pack your bag with concepts like Lean Six Sigma, PMBOK, IPMA, Prince2, Process Engineering, Software Engineering, Statistics. Whenever you have the opportunity, sharpen your skills.

  1. I noticed you have earned several certifications. What type of value has these certifications provided to you in your career?

I have a Master in Information Technology I got at the Stuttgart University in Germany. This was a quite technical education and I therefore pursued a project management certification, namely the ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner). Due to my technical background I identified I needed a soft-skill approach, and pursued a CSM (Certified ScrumMaster). Besides the ACP and CSM, I possess the CSPO (Certified Scrum Product Owner) and CSD (Certified Scrum Developer). Since I always loved teaching, I pursued the CST (Certified Scrum Trainer). They helped me a lot! Your CV is strengthened by the certifications you have and it is used by HR as a initial preselection process. Ultimately your experience validates your certifications (and not the other way around) so strengthen your CV and experiment always.

  1. Do you think the industry is catching up to better understanding the benefits of Agile and Scrum?

Absolutely. Today there are several surveys stating the benefits organizations obtain from implementing Scrum and the Agile mindset. Nevertheless, the Agile mindset is counter-intuitive to the ultimate goal of the massive majority of corporations today so there is a very, very long road ahead and many projects and surveys to come.

  1. What are some of the major gaps you still see in the project management profession and what can industries do to address them?

I am not sure I can call these gaps but they are: 1. Lack of a holistic approach and 2. Lack of open-mindedness. Let me elaborate on each one.

  1. Project managers should not focus on project management areas only (think of the areas described on the PMBOK). They do need to be specialists in project management and have a deep understanding of all tools and techniques available. At the same time, they must have the minimal ability to work outside their area and understand and talk about financing, engineering, software development, logistics, electronics, etc. That is being versatile and holistic.
  2. A project manager that thinks of herself as the nirvana of her profession is very likely to suffer from a career downturn. I have heard from thought leaders things like “Scrum is not a good enough project management methodology”. Of course not! Scrum wasn’t born to be neither a project management framework nor methodology. This is what I mean by of lack of open-mindedness. A great project manager understands that there is always room for improvement and Scrum and Agile are additional concepts to be added to their bag of tools.
  3. What type of things do you do to stay current in your field (professional development)?

I listen a lot to people, specially those outside my work area and divide my time between consulting and teaching. Being always in the trenches gives me a lot of ideas and allows me to create new things and learn new concepts and techniques. Besides that I attend leadership trainings as much as I can and read about spirituality. Being a great leader is about self-awareness so I strive for it every day. I am aware that I will never quite get there.

  1. What are your last thoughts or closing remarks to our project manager subscribers?

Kaizen, kaizen, kaizen. Help improve others and improve yourself in the process, be your own Kaizen Meister!

Connect with Connect with Heitor Roriz Filho: https://www.scrumalliance.org/community/profile/hroriz